VRMG

Vision, role, mission, goal

One of the key concerns about standard business strategy-frameworks such as the Business Rules Group’s Business Motivation Model is that they start too far down, as if the organisation is the sole centre of the world. The VRMG framework we use starts much higher, at a level that makes it possible to build strategies even for complex, distributed, multi-partner enterprises.

For more information, see:

Vision, role, mission, goal

      • Vision: describes a desired ‘world’
        • purpose: identifies the overall space shared with competitors, customers, partners, suppliers and other stakeholders
        • examples: “a more sociable world” (brewers Lion Nathan), “boundaryless sharing of information” (TOGAF)
        • scope: always larger than the organisation; should never change, hence acts as permanent anchor for quality-system etc
        • measurable: not measurable as such, and never ‘achieved’
        • problems: this type of vision is frequently absent from strategic models and frameworks – absence will render framework (and strategy) unstable and error-prone
      • Role(s): what the organisation aims to do and not do within that ‘world’
        • purpose: identifies where the organisation intersects with customers, partners, stakeholders etc
        • examples: brewer and distributor (Lion Nathan), provider of police services (Essex Police)
        • scope: identifies boundaries of operation within the vision-‘world’, and complementary roles for other stakeholders; will change slowly over time
        • measurable: only in a ‘true/false’ sense of ‘how well are we maintaining this role?’, and ‘achieved’ in a dynamic rather than static sense
        • problems: a role is a means to the ‘ends’ of the vision, but occasionally mistaken as an ‘end’ itself
      • Mission(s): new capabilities and/or services the organisation intends to create (via Goals) and maintain
        • purpose: identifies the means needed to support the ‘ends’ of the vision, and the measures needed to verify that the required support is being provided
        • example [new capability]: achieve and maintain 20% market for brewed products in ANZ market; provide DNA-based forensic evidence facilities for Essex
        • scope: must identifiably suppport the vision and role; does not end when ‘achieved’; will change with normal business strategy cycle
        • measurable: must be measurable/verifiable; transitions to measurable continuous improvement once initially ‘achieved’
        • problems: a mission is primarily a ‘means’, not an ‘end’, but is frequently misunderstood / misdescribed as ‘vision’; frequently described in non-measurable ‘vision’-like terms’ (e.g. ‘taking a lead in the security of Essex’)
      • Goal(s): project with a specified set of deliverables and a target date for completion
        • purpose: identifies a single finite set of activities required in order to support and/or maintain a mission
        • example: bring DNA database on-line for all Essex forensic units by «date»
        • scope: must be associated with a ‘parent’ mission; should end on completion; will change frequently in accordance with business tactics
        • measurable: measurable only in ‘true/false’ terms, as conformance with deliverables and/or completion date
        • problems: a goal is occasionally misunderstood / misdescribed as ‘vision’, often with disastrous results – for example, all motivation is lost once the goal-‘vision’ is achieved